Peter – PWRDF

Mundri
Mundri, Western Equatoria, South Sudan. Photo/Paul Jeffrey

When South Sudan’s civil war broke out in Juba in December 2013, 19-year-old Peter Frisus fled from the violence in his homeland. The fighting displaced Peter and more than a million of his fellow South Sudanese. He eventually settled in Mundri, a region of South Sudan that was not experiencing violence. He has survived there thanks to the hospitality of his relatives, along with food and agricultural tools provided by the Mundri Relief and Development Association, which is supported by the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund. PWRDF, working with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank and with funding from the Government of Canada, had a project in Mundri to provide seeds and tools to displaced families, as well as food for several months while their new crops were growing. Peter’s uncle let him use some land to farm peanuts and corn and he displays some of the peanuts he harvested. Here is Peter’s story:

I lived in Juba when the war broke out. I saw the fighting, and people dying. It was terrible. There was no way to leave because no vehicles were moving, but finally with my five brothers I started walking. At the edge of the city we finally found a truck, a very crowded truck, that took us to Mundri. We came here because we have family here.

It was tough for the first few days because there wasn’t enough food. Our relatives welcomed us and took care of us, but they didn’t have enough food. Then MRDA (Mundri Relief and Development Agency, PWRDF’s partner in the area) helped by providing food.

I’m staying with an uncle, and he let me use some of his land to farm. I got some tools for digging in the ground from MRDA and planted corn and peanuts. What I harvested helps, but it’s not enough. It will soon run out.

I am from the Moru tribe, but when the fighting started in Juba they didn’t care what tribe you were from. Anything could happen. That’s why I was afraid. I don’t want to go back there, even if the war ends soon. I am happy here with my relatives. But we need help to get enough food.

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